Checklist of Supporting Documents for I-751 Removal of Conditions

This is a general list of documents to show a good-faith marriage as required to remove the conditions on your current permanent resident status.  While we ideally want to include as much evidence as possible, we understand that not all the items listed below will apply.   Please provide what documents you can and we will work through any special circumstances.

– Joint tax returns from the previous 2-3 years;
– Joint bank statements (these should date back to when you first opened the account or at least since you have been married);
– Copies of driver’s licenses showing the same address;
– Mortgage or lease agreement with both names;
– Copies of joint credit cards (many statements have a “members since” date so a current one will be fine);
– Copies of any joint utilities or cell phone bills;
– Copies of life insurance policies naming the other as a beneficiary;
– Joint retirement or savings account statements (again, it is helpful to have a history covering your marriage or proof of beneficiary designated);
– Copies of any estate planning documents naming the other as a beneficiary;
– Copies of joint vehicle titles;
– Joint airline/vacation reservations;
– Photos of the two of you together and with family;
– Birth announcements, photos, sonograms, etc. for any children or soon-to-be born children;
– Any other joint assets or holdings (including stocks or trading accounts);
– 2 U.S. passport-style photos (This is only mandatory if living overseas);
– Names of 2 people, preferably on the U.S. Citizen’s side of the family or mutual friends willing to sign an affidavit confirming the authenticity of your marriage.

The information in red typically holds the most weight with USCIS, so we want to provide them, if applicable.  Overall, we want to provide 7-8 items from the list when filing.  Please do not hesitate to ask questions as we go through this process and we look forward to working with you.

 

“This memo is provided for informational purposes and discussion only.  It does not act as a substitute for direct legal contact on an individual basis.”